0

Iconic British Food Packaging Designs

There are many foods and drinks that we in the UK might consider to be really British. These include products that we use on a daily basis that we don’t even think about. 

Take Greggs for example

It’s hard to imagine Greggs is not as accessible to everyone around the world as it is us in the North East. Living in Newcastle, the birthplace of the Greggs pasty, you have quick access to one on just about every corner. They’re a national favourite and something we grew up with. Yet to international visitors they are new and almost unheard of.

One of the interesting things about these British brands is how they have developed as a company over time. Most of us are too young to remember what the first Greggs packaging looked like. The bakery started out more than 80 years ago and during this time it has changed considerably.

Greggs started out by delivering eggs and flour before ever baking bread. The food packaging in those early days consisted of brown paper bags. There wasn’t any branding, just a little something to get your fresh bread back to the house without it touching the inside of your shopping bag

{Image Credit: http://www.yesterdaystechnology.com/html/4_square_snap_cards.html} {Image Credit: https://flic.kr/p/6QEiEn}

 

As the business progressed their branding did too. To my understanding products were also accompanied by a Greggs family seal of approval. It is a family business after all.

Today’s food packaging reflects the more eco-friendly values that many businesses in the industry are pushing. A lot of the products are served in bio-degradable materials or minimalist packaging. This is more suited to the on-the-go service Greggs now provides.

 {Image Credit: http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/local-news/community-news-brief-thursday-april-6913461}  {Image Credit: http://www.packagingdesignarchive.org/archive/pack_details/121-ringtons}

 

Next up is Ringtons

Ringtons is yet another example of a brand our neighbours across the water know very little about, but to us it is a well-known household name.

The company started out life in Newcastle upon Tyne. It doesn’t get much more British than a man trading tea from a horse and carriage. The business started out in 1907 and was, in the beginning, something very simple. It wasn’t long though before the demand for their tea products increased.

When Ringtons became a recognised brand with its very own packaging things were pretty simple. Their packaging was colourful and attractive but none the less simple. That aspect hasn’t changed much. The minimalistic and eco-friendly theme however is continued here too.

 

 

{Image Credit: http://www.therecanbeonlyjuan.co.za/2010_01_24_archive.html} {Image Credit:  http://bit.ly/1CXeqDA}

 

Let’s not forget Twinings

Another brand in the tea industry here is Twinings. This company started out in London and has diversified and expanded its range over the years. Supplying various teas, coffees and even hot chocolates they have hot drinks for everyone. Despite their product range expanding their packaging hasn’t changed all that much.

Perhaps it can be assumed that tea packaging is already a fairly eco-friendly selection without having to catch up to modern times. There is something to be said for keeping to the same standard of design. It certainly works for them. Despite offering individually packaged teabags more suited to hotel rooms, the classic earl grey box still remains a favourite.

 

 

{Image Credit: http://www.oldshopstuff.com/Shop/tabid/1248/ItemID/10716/Listing/Old-Tin-for-Birds-Custard-Powder/Default.aspx} {Image Credit: http://www.britishcornershop.co.uk/birds-custard-powder-original

 

It would be rude not too

Bird’s custard is a very British food product. The instant custard powder was created by a chemist from Birmingham in 1837. His reasoning for all his efforts…to creating a solution for his wife, who loved custard but was allergic to eggs.

Not much about their food packaging has changed. The design gained a revamp and the logo has become a little more childish and customer targeted. The main change however is the material used for the tin itself.

These days the custard is packaged in a bio-degradable cardboard with a plastic lid. It is effective, eco-friendly and probably cheap to produce.

Even with these changes the packaging still maintains its effective round tin design.


0 Comments



Post a Comment


Please sign in or create an account to post a comment

Iconic British Food Packaging Designs

There are many foods and drinks that we in the UK might consider to be really British. These include products that we use on a daily basis that we don’t even think about. 

Take Greggs for example

It’s hard to imagine Greggs is not as accessible to everyone around the world as it is us in the North East. Living in Newcastle, the birthplace of the Greggs pasty, you have quick access to one on just about every corner. They’re a national favourite and something we grew up with. Yet to international visitors they are new and almost unheard of.

One of the interesting things about these British brands is how they have developed as a company over time. Most of us are too young to remember what the first Greggs packaging looked like. The bakery started out more than 80 years ago and during this time it has changed considerably.

Greggs started out by delivering eggs and flour before ever baking bread. The food packaging in those early days consisted of brown paper bags. There wasn’t any branding, just a little something to get your fresh bread back to the house without it touching the inside of your shopping bag

{Image Credit: http://www.yesterdaystechnology.com/html/4_square_snap_cards.html} {Image Credit: https://flic.kr/p/6QEiEn}

 

As the business progressed their branding did too. To my understanding products were also accompanied by a Greggs family seal of approval. It is a family business after all.

Today’s food packaging reflects the more eco-friendly values that many businesses in the industry are pushing. A lot of the products are served in bio-degradable materials or minimalist packaging. This is more suited to the on-the-go service Greggs now provides.

 {Image Credit: http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/local-news/community-news-brief-thursday-april-6913461}  {Image Credit: http://www.packagingdesignarchive.org/archive/pack_details/121-ringtons}

 

Next up is Ringtons

Ringtons is yet another example of a brand our neighbours across the water know very little about, but to us it is a well-known household name.

The company started out life in Newcastle upon Tyne. It doesn’t get much more British than a man trading tea from a horse and carriage. The business started out in 1907 and was, in the beginning, something very simple. It wasn’t long though before the demand for their tea products increased.

When Ringtons became a recognised brand with its very own packaging things were pretty simple. Their packaging was colourful and attractive but none the less simple. That aspect hasn’t changed much. The minimalistic and eco-friendly theme however is continued here too.

 

 

{Image Credit: http://www.therecanbeonlyjuan.co.za/2010_01_24_archive.html} {Image Credit:  http://bit.ly/1CXeqDA}

 

Let’s not forget Twinings

Another brand in the tea industry here is Twinings. This company started out in London and has diversified and expanded its range over the years. Supplying various teas, coffees and even hot chocolates they have hot drinks for everyone. Despite their product range expanding their packaging hasn’t changed all that much.

Perhaps it can be assumed that tea packaging is already a fairly eco-friendly selection without having to catch up to modern times. There is something to be said for keeping to the same standard of design. It certainly works for them. Despite offering individually packaged teabags more suited to hotel rooms, the classic earl grey box still remains a favourite.

 

 

{Image Credit: http://www.oldshopstuff.com/Shop/tabid/1248/ItemID/10716/Listing/Old-Tin-for-Birds-Custard-Powder/Default.aspx} {Image Credit: http://www.britishcornershop.co.uk/birds-custard-powder-original

 

It would be rude not too

Bird’s custard is a very British food product. The instant custard powder was created by a chemist from Birmingham in 1837. His reasoning for all his efforts…to creating a solution for his wife, who loved custard but was allergic to eggs.

Not much about their food packaging has changed. The design gained a revamp and the logo has become a little more childish and customer targeted. The main change however is the material used for the tin itself.

These days the custard is packaged in a bio-degradable cardboard with a plastic lid. It is effective, eco-friendly and probably cheap to produce.

Even with these changes the packaging still maintains its effective round tin design.


0 Comments



Post a Comment


Please sign in or create an account to post a comment
Blog Categories
Blog Archive
Blog Categories
Blog Archive